Preppers Universe’s take on the Seven Myths of Prepping

How to be Prepared

There are a lot of myths, misinformation and stereo types when it comes to prepping and preppers.  In this article, I will be discussing the top seven myths about prepping.  Understanding these myths are important because your knowledge could mean the difference between surviving and helping others survive around you.  The key- understand the true meaning of being prepared.

Myth #1: It’s too expensive!

Prepping does not have to be expensive. You do not need to spend thousands of dollars on a years supply of MRE’s for you’re family.  The key is to start small and gradually build your preps over time.

Prepping is too ExpensiveGranted, if you spend too much time and effort prepping, the end result is a change to you’re lifestyle.  You will need to balance the changes needed for prudent preparations within reasonable limits.  There are a lot of options with prepping and many of them are not expensive.

You should start with an emergency 72-hour kit.  They are fairly inexpensive and for a few hundred dollars you can have a really nice kit.  Read The Preppers Universe Guide to 72-Hour Kits for more info.

Myth #2: Prepping takes too much time!

Many people have seen the TV show “Doomsday Preppers” and have a perception that in order to be a prepper means you have to dedicate you’re life to it.  This is not true, you do not need to change you’re lifestyle at all.  Prepping only takes couple of hours per month if done correctly.  The time you spend prepping is minimal considering the consequences of doing nothing.

Myth - Prepping takes too much time!The key is to have a plan and enough supplies to sustain you’re family during a disaster.  Lets face it, we live in a chaotic world and we need to be prepared and sustain our families and friends when things go south.  One only needs to look at what happened to the poor people of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina to understand the importance of prepping.  A couple of hours per month is all you need to prep for survival.  Get rid of any notions that tell you otherwise.

Myth #3: Prepping takes up to much storage space!

Many people believe they don’t have enough room to store their provisions.  Prepping for a disaster does not need to be complicated and anyone can find the space to store a little extra supplies.

food storage shelvesFor example, my garage was filled with crap I didn’t use anymore.  I simply got rid of stuff I did not need and made room in the corner of the garage to store my emergency supplies.  The common areas most people forget about are attics, basements and closets.  You can use these locations to store junk or items you don’t use that often.

Always store emergency provisions in a location easily accessible during a disaster.  They must be accessible even if you’re house is inaccessible.  I personally store my provisions in the garage near the roll up door.  It would be easy to get to even if I could not enter the house.

Myth #4: You need a bug out location or retreat!

Missile Silo BunkerPlease do not get on the Doomsday bandwagon and go out and by yourself a retired missile silo.  The sad truth is having a retreat is nice but in a real disaster you will most likely not be able to reach it in a timely matter.  I am a firm believer in BUGGING IN not OUT.  Don’t get me wrong I do have a bug out bag handy just in case.  But, it is the absolute last thing I plan on doing if there were no other option.

The key is to have a PLAN on where you’re family can meet up in case you were separated.  This could be another family members house or a camp site.  The kids are at school and you’re at work.  What does you’re family do when a disaster happens?  Where do you meet up?  What if you’re home is inaccessible?  These are the questions to ask yourself.  Having a plan is the key to survival – not a million dollar condo in a missile silo.

Myth #5: Prepping will turn me into a crackpot!

Crackpot PreppersThis image is from stereotypes of sociopath loners like Ted Kaczynski the “uni-bomber” and right-wing militias that thrive on visions of conspiracies to justify firearm fanaticism’s.  Being a prepper will not turn you into a crackpot in the woods, dressed in camouflage threatening trespassers with explosives.

The truth- preppers are your normal day to day people who over the years realize the system (Government) may not always be around to support them.  They feel a need to provide for their own safety and survival.  Even if you are a newbie prepper with no emergency supplies, once you get started prepping you will see positive results.  You will be more confident in the fact that you have done you’re very best in protecting you’re family from disaster.

Myth #6: Weapons are the most important thing!

Assault WeaponsIn light of the pending gun control debate.  Many preppers have lost focus on the true meaning of being prepared.  They have been buying up every semi-auto AR-15 in existence because they fear the government.  Ammo is non-existent on store shelves and because of this most of the average preppers budget is spent on buying weapons and ammo.

If you’re primary focus is on buying weapons then other areas of you’re prepping needs are put on the back burner.  If you don’t have enough provisions to provide for you’re family for at least (Minimum) 3-months then you are putting you’re family at risk.  If you already own a firearm with enough ammo to last awhile – do not waste money on more weapons.  It would be a mistake to play into you’re fears and forget the true meaning of being prepared.  Being prepared is more than owning a lot of weapons.

Myth #7: Prepping is everyman for himself!

When a disaster strikes it is important to understand man is not an island and he cannot survive on his own.  It is not human nature to be alone and when you have an army of people scavenging the neighborhood looking for food you will need to compromise and provide help where needed.  The key is to create a support or community group.  The bottom line, you will need to band together with you’re neighbors even if they are not preppers.

Keeping the peace is important because when things go south society norms will go out the window.  People will form vigilante groups and pillage for food and water.   You will want you’re neighbors on you’re side to help protect (the neighborhood) at which helps protect you’re emergency supply and in turn protects you’re family.

I know you have some questions.  Like why should I provide them with food and water when they did not prepare themselves?  Heck they may even have called you a crackpot because you were a prepper.  This does not change the fact that you will need help.  This should be part of you’re emergency plan – have provisions to use as barter or as I like to term keeping the peace within you’re neighborhood.

I personally keep extra supplies for this exact purpose.  I keep several cases of “cup-of-noodles” on hand to use as barter.  These noodle cups can be stored for up to a year, don’t take up much room and the best part is they are VERY CHEAP.  You can get 5 CASES for around $100.  Trust me, when a disaster happens and you’re neighbors haven’t eaten a thing in three days they would be very and I mean very appreciative to have a cup of hot noodles.

Conclusion

In this article we discussed the seven myths of prepping and why being prepared is so important.  Prepping is the everyday norm in our society and it’s not only fanatics that plan for disasters. Protecting you’re family should be you’re number one goal.

Look out for my next article on “How to form a community group during a disaster.”

Rodney Butler

By Rodney Butler

Source: http://preppersuniverse.com/the-top-seven-myths-of-prepping/

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